Monday, September 9, 2013

Quick Check Board for Forming Small Groups


I have been working really hard to get better at grouping students during math in order to really meet everyone's needs in terms of skill.  A great and easy way to do this was suggested to me by my co-worker, Monster Wrangler Mike.  He has been using it since last year and has seen great results with helping to create differentiated groups and help students that are struggling to master our Common Core curriculum.

I introduce to you......

THE QUICK CHECK BOARD!!!
Each morning, a mathematical problem is posted on my Promethean Board.  The problem may be a skill that I have already taught my students, or a new skill.  Either way, this is a very simple way to quickly see who has mastered the skill and who needs a little re-teaching with a mini-lesson or small group activity.

Each child gets a sticky note on their desk.  When they enter my classroom, they unpack, get ready for the day and begin the Quick Check as a morning work assignment.  They complete the problem showing as much work as possible, and place it on their designated student number spot on the chart.  This is also fantastic in quickly seeing who has completed their morning work and who has not.  

Since I have math in the middle of my day, I have time during lunch to go and quickly put a "check" or "x" depending on whether it is correct or incorrect.  
This morning's quick check asked students to write an expression for the problem:  11 times the difference of 12 and 5.

When our math time comes around, I will typically begin with a mini-lesson and then separate my class into groups based on previous pre-assessments.  When the groups go to their tasks, I pull the small group of students who missed the quick check, go over it, and usually work on a mini-activity with them to clarify the skill.  

One of the reasons that I love this is because it really does allow for flexible grouping since the student mastery changes day to day.  It's the perfect daily assessment tool that is easily manageable.  Thanks, Monster Wrangler Mike!

3 comments:

  1. I love this! What a fabulous and fun idea. And because the question changes each day no one is pigeon-holed into being the "poor" math student. Thanks for the suggestion!

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  2. Could also be used as an exit ticket for older student (MS and HS)

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  3. Good way to test art students on previously taught concepts.

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